Jabriella
"The subjective can never be elbowed side. It hovers inescapably, like an off-stage voice, whispering, whispering, whispering..."
Jabriella
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versacesadboy:

Why do you always use binoculars?
It helps me see things closer. Even if they’re not very far away. I pretend it’s my magic power.
versacesadboy:

Why do you always use binoculars?
It helps me see things closer. Even if they’re not very far away. I pretend it’s my magic power.
versacesadboy:

Why do you always use binoculars?
It helps me see things closer. Even if they’re not very far away. I pretend it’s my magic power.
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I’ve always had good luck with butterflies #beautifulnature (x)
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chrislilleyfans:

Jonah From Tonga is the best tv show you will EVER see
Watch the whole series online on ABC iView & BBC iPlayer May 2nd-May 4th and you can watch it on TV from May 7th at 9pm on ABC1/May 8th at 10pm on BBC Three!
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todaysdocument:

The Johnson “Treatment”
Standing at 6 feet 4 inches tall, President Lyndon Baines Johnson used his imposing stature as one tool in his own brand of political persuasion, known as the Johnson “treatment.” LBJ used his “treatment,” shown in the photograph above, to intimidate, badger, flatter, or plead in order to achieve his political goals. 

President Johnson and Louis Martin at the reception for Democratic National Committee Delegates, April 20, 1966

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)
This photo  is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.
During the recent #Signatures tweetup for the “Making their Mark” exhibit, we coaxed exhibit curator Jennifer Johnson (r) and designer Amanda Perez (l) into re-enacting the scene.  It was a little tricky for everyone to keep a straight face, but they were great sports!
todaysdocument:

The Johnson “Treatment”
Standing at 6 feet 4 inches tall, President Lyndon Baines Johnson used his imposing stature as one tool in his own brand of political persuasion, known as the Johnson “treatment.” LBJ used his “treatment,” shown in the photograph above, to intimidate, badger, flatter, or plead in order to achieve his political goals. 

President Johnson and Louis Martin at the reception for Democratic National Committee Delegates, April 20, 1966

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)
This photo  is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.
During the recent #Signatures tweetup for the “Making their Mark” exhibit, we coaxed exhibit curator Jennifer Johnson (r) and designer Amanda Perez (l) into re-enacting the scene.  It was a little tricky for everyone to keep a straight face, but they were great sports!
todaysdocument:

The Johnson “Treatment”
Standing at 6 feet 4 inches tall, President Lyndon Baines Johnson used his imposing stature as one tool in his own brand of political persuasion, known as the Johnson “treatment.” LBJ used his “treatment,” shown in the photograph above, to intimidate, badger, flatter, or plead in order to achieve his political goals. 

President Johnson and Louis Martin at the reception for Democratic National Committee Delegates, April 20, 1966

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)
This photo  is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.
During the recent #Signatures tweetup for the “Making their Mark” exhibit, we coaxed exhibit curator Jennifer Johnson (r) and designer Amanda Perez (l) into re-enacting the scene.  It was a little tricky for everyone to keep a straight face, but they were great sports!
todaysdocument:

The Johnson “Treatment”
Standing at 6 feet 4 inches tall, President Lyndon Baines Johnson used his imposing stature as one tool in his own brand of political persuasion, known as the Johnson “treatment.” LBJ used his “treatment,” shown in the photograph above, to intimidate, badger, flatter, or plead in order to achieve his political goals. 

President Johnson and Louis Martin at the reception for Democratic National Committee Delegates, April 20, 1966

(via the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” eGuide)
This photo  is among the featured items at the “Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures" exhibit now on display at the National Archives Museum.
During the recent #Signatures tweetup for the “Making their Mark” exhibit, we coaxed exhibit curator Jennifer Johnson (r) and designer Amanda Perez (l) into re-enacting the scene.  It was a little tricky for everyone to keep a straight face, but they were great sports!
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parenthetical-grrrl:

This is so important.
parenthetical-grrrl:

This is so important.